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ROVING CAMERA BLOG • Tech

Sony F3 Camcorder Preview

Yesterday afternoon I attended a preview of the new Sony Super 35 PMW-F3 camera, presented by Snader & Associates and hosted by Videofax at their new rental facility in San Francisco. Reps from Sony and from Snader, who sells the camera, were on hand to present the camera’s features and specs, and three F3s with an array of accessories provided ample opportunity for hands-on time.

The F3 is an impressive little box, a little larger (6 x 7-1/2 x 8-3/8 inches) and heavier than Sony’s popular PMW-EX3 camera (5 lb. 4 oz. for the F3, compared to 4 lb. 2 oz. for the EX3). But the F3 contains a new Exmor Super 35 CMOS sensor, much larger than the ½-inch chip in the EX3.

And size matters. The Super 35 sensor is one of the largest chips in any HD camera, except for the Canon DSLRs and Vision Research’s high speed Phantom 65. Large sensors mean shallow depth of field, the prevalent style of our times – fuzzy backgrounds for our shots and focusing headaches for our camera assistants, the polar opposite of Gregg Toland’s deep focus photography a la Citizen Kane in 1941.

The Super 35 chip is 23.6 mm x 13.3 mm, considerably larger than that of another highly touted new sensor on the market, the micro 4/3”. Both are 13.3 mm tall, but the Super 35 chip is 23.6 mm wide and has an HD compatible . . . CONTINUE READING: Sony F3 Camcorder Preview

ROVING CAMERA BLOG • Travel • Production • Tech

Around the World in 11 Days: Epilogue

On our way back to the hotel after the shoot at the Karaoke club, Richard spontaneously has our driver pull the gigantic van over, right in the middle of Shibuya Square, the famed, neon-crazy crossing in the heart of Tokyo, through which nearly a million people pass every day.

We hop out into the mob scene on the sidewalk, shooting pictures and video and gaping at thecrowds. Randy climbs the built-in ladder on the gigantic van to a flat platform on the roof and shoots the huge video billboards, ads for pop stars, flashing lights, car traffic, and human flow with his Sony EX3.

We remain parked there for at least half an hour, with no permission, no permits, no pesky police presence threatening us, issuing citations, or even politely asking us to move. . . . CONTINUE READING: Around the World in 11 Days: Epilogue

ROVING CAMERA BLOG • Travel • Production • Tech

Around the World in 11 Days: Part 3

Our flight to Japan on Virgin Atlantic is half-empty and quite comfortable. Virgin’s Premium Economy seats, which our travel agent says were not much more expensive than standard Economy, provide better food, better seats, better video, and more legroom.

Our flight leaves London at 1 pm Sunday. Twelve hours later, after flying nearly 6000 miles east across nine time zones, we arrive at Narita Airport outside Tokyo, where, somehow, it’s 10 am Monday. In San Francisco it’s still 5 pm Sunday, 17 hours earlier than Tokyo. None of us sleep much on the plane. The time change has us oddly discombobulated. Our midday departure and the availability of hundreds of movies (we’re all film buffs) both mitigate against sleep, as does, oddly, our enjoyment of the extra comfort on this flight.

. . . CONTINUE READING: Around the World in 11 Days: Part 3